A Travellerspoint blog

September 2012

Laos

First Lao lunch!

First Lao lunch!


All we had heard about Laos and its people instantly turned out to be true. As soon as we crossed the border from Vietnam no more tuk tuks chased after us, people smiled peacefully and greeted us with polite "Sabaidee!" as we walked along, and some vendors even had to be woken up from their naps to buy anything from them.
Our first night we spent by the river in Muang Khua meeting up for meals with some friends we had met along the way. Ashley and Bo were a pleasure to spend time with, their friendly energy infectious, and we ended up traveling for a couple of days with them and trying new foods out together. So off we all set on the same river boat cruise to Nong Khiaw, and delighted in the scenes of lush green mountains bordering the calm river, the many children running along the banks and diving into the water playfully, the buffalo grazing on bright green grass, the pigs running around, the thatched huts with woven bamboo walls.
Boat ride

Boat ride

Boat ride

Boat ride

Boat ride

Boat ride

Boat ride

Boat ride

Boat ride

Boat ride

Boat ride

Boat ride


Our destination was just as beautiful, with tall rocky hills dressed in low forest overlooking the wide river that splits the town, its edges dotted here and there with women in sarongs, men in underwear and children naked for their afternoon bath. In northern Laos people dress conservatively, women wearing skirts reaching below the knees and tops always having sleeves and no cleavage; men never walk around shirtless and there are signs in some tourist places requesting that visitors follow the same code. But then there's the contrasting bathing time, where anyone, regardless of age or gender, will walk out to the river or a public water fountain or even to a faucet just outside their home by the road to bathe, and then nudity and partial nudity are absolutely natural and acceptable.
Best Lao soup!

Best Lao soup!

Bomb turned peace sign!

Bomb turned peace sign!

Nong Kiaw

Nong Kiaw

$4 dollar bungalow by river side

$4 dollar bungalow by river side


We had our own turn at it a few days later, when in Luang Nam Tha we booked a tour to the national park nearby. It was meant to be a two day trek into the dense jungles of Nam Ha, and while our intention was to have a chance of finding wildlife, our experience turned out to be a wonderful cultural exchange. Our guide Bouket first took us around the corner from our hotel to the local market for some supplies. Just as Juan and I were wondering why he hadn't taken care of that earlier so that we could start with our tour on time, we started noticing some peculiar sights amongst the stands: buffalo fetus, farmed piranha, live frogs tied by their legs ready to fry... We decided to skip all that and stick with the vegetables, which looked much more appetizing.
Buffalo fetus! =(

Buffalo fetus! =(

Yummy larvae

Yummy larvae

Poor frogs!

Poor frogs!

This looks better =)

This looks better =)


Our trek started several miles from there, at the edge of a small town where huts dried corn by hanging it from the leaves to the bottom of their raised wooden homes and men laboriously fabricated knives on small fires with artisan appliances. At one edge of the village, wide fields of rice stretched out into the sun, at the other, mild hills begun to show the forest we were to journey into. Bouket is a middle-aged man who grew up in this area. He used to venture these forests for hunting, and is now one of the many poachers-turned-guides who earn an income by taking visitors on nature observation expeditions rather than exploiting the forest in the previous, more destructive way. However he only is called in about once every two months for these tours, so to make ends meet he tends to his small farm. We soon found out though that he could easily make a living as a cook! During our hike he cut off a couple of bamboo shoots, collected some forest ferns and chopped a few leaves off of a spiny palm; soon he had that along with some sticky rice cooking up over the fire, and before we knew it we were enjoying the most delicious meal we had had in Laos yet! It was all served on wild banana leaves spread out on the ground, seasoned with some chiles and other vegetables purchased earlier in the market, and we each had our own clump of sticky rice, which we would grab to scoot the different foods up and eat up with our hands. At the end of the fantastic meal that my mouth is watering over as I write, Bouket and Cham (the second guide we picked up in town) would recollect the remaining rice from each of our clumps and stack it back together for the next meal! Whatever, everyone was clean enough and we didn't mind =).
We spent the night in a thatched wooden hut, where Bouket graciously set up a couple of long cushions and blankets for us to sleep, but before that, it was bath time! Yes, with company! Down we all walked to the river, and while I was wondering to myself whether it would be impolite to show as much skin as a bikini does, Bouket stripped down to his worn-out briefs and pranced happily into the water. Then I knew we were all right =). He was like a little boy, laughing, walking down the river in his underwear, carrying a small net over his head and throwing it enthusiastically into the water. He yelled out with joy when he caught the tiniest fish, and throughout the two days would always share with great interest any little insect he'd encounter. You could tell he was having a good time just as much as we were, and actually most of our enjoyment was thanks to him! We soon realized that we would not see much wildlife on our trail, as the tour took us only to secondary forest, which is sadly hunted out without a second thought in rural south east Asia. But Bouket's genuine giving personality, his spontaneous laughs and smiles and childlike occurrences made us feel fortunate we had had the luck of ending up on a tour with him. At the end of our two days we said our goodbyes with many hugs and smiles and thanks, and as he left us he yelled out warmly: "I will remember you for a very long time!"
Resting from the sun!

Resting from the sun!

Crazy woman in the forest.

Crazy woman in the forest.

Painting fruit.

Painting fruit.

Unidentified colubrid.

Unidentified colubrid.

Sustainable packaging.

Sustainable packaging.

Best lunch ever!

Best lunch ever!

Shooting Gold Medallist.

Shooting Gold Medallist.

Cross bow

Cross bow

Cool tree lizard.

Cool tree lizard.

Tree Lizard

Tree Lizard

Ferns on Fire

Ferns on Fire

Bamboo shoots

Bamboo shoots

Kupu Kupuk!

Kupu Kupuk!

Gigantic millipede

Gigantic millipede

Old rusty USA ammunition box on the forest floor (Vietnam war era)

Old rusty USA ammunition box on the forest floor (Vietnam war era)

Eating my shoots with sticky rice!

Eating my shoots with sticky rice!

Wildlife trap (obviously we didn't use it!)

Wildlife trap (obviously we didn't use it!)

Scary bamboo bridge

Scary bamboo bridge


Albino water buffalos!

Albino water buffalos!

Rice harvest storage huts.

Rice harvest storage huts.


Best green papaya salad

Best green papaya salad

Juan with best pork ribs and cold beer Lao at night market.

Juan with best pork ribs and cold beer Lao at night market.

Zuela guest house

Zuela guest house


Luang Prabang was a larger town, but with all the charm in the world! With many attractions around it like brilliant waterfalls, elephant training workshops, trekking and ancient temples, one of the main ones in town is the night market. Every single night of the year one long street in the city center is closed off for hundreds of vendors to set out their merchandise. There are gorgeous crafts, antiques, beautiful hand made clothes, paintings and delicious food set up in the most orderly manner. We of course wanted to buy from everyone! The good news is that it was easy to save on food at the 10,000 kip (1.2 USD) buffets of noodles, salads, stir fries, and all kinds of vegetables. Delicious!
Luang Prabang

Luang Prabang

Luang Prabang

Luang Prabang

Great $1 street sandwich

Great $1 street sandwich


Our last stop was Vientiane, the capital from which we were to catch a train to Bangkok, Thailand. For a capital Vientiane is surprisingly slow-moving, with few vehicles even on the main streets. We did visit a couple of beautiful temples, the Buddah Park and the night market, but probably our favorite thing here was to indulge in the food. Vientiane has great options for both traditional and international cuisine, including several french-style bakeries and the most delicious non-profit restaurant/training school we've ever been to: Makphet. Managed by Friends International (www.friends-international.org), this restaurant focuses on helping economically disadvantaged youth from the area to develop knowledge and skills useful to become more self-sufficient. In Makphet these people receive training in hospitality, high-end cooking and even craftsmanship for a better future. And I can safely say I have never in my life tried a more delicious eggplant dish than there!
Pha That Luang Temple

Pha That Luang Temple

Cindy in Tuk Tuk

Cindy in Tuk Tuk


We left Laos very happy with our experience there, wishing we had more time to explore it. Beautiful country, wonderful people!

Posted by juan y Cindy 22:38 Archived in Laos Comments (1)

Vietnam

Crazy crazy crazy!

Juan and Cindy

Juan and Cindy


Ho Chi Minh
Ho Chi Minh was OVERFLOWING with motorcycles! Before we even stepped off the bus that drove us to our first Vietnamese city we couldn't keep our faces off the windows. The wide streets seemed like a net of intersecting loud, shiny, colorful, metallic rivers. Two-wheeled vehicles in all directions, honking incessantly, weaving around each other, going the wrong way, getting up on the sidewalk, swerving around people crossing the streets. We loved it already!
Our first minute on Vietnamese grounds readied us for keeping our guards up when a taxi tried to charge us $10 USD to take us literally two blocks from where we were standing. Fortunately we looked at our map before jumping in with him! Soon we were in a very decent budget hotel, excited about our upcoming weeks in this new-to-us land.
War museum

War museum

War museum

War museum


We purchased an open bus ticket that would take us at our own pace from Ho Chi Minh all the way to the capital Hanoi, north of the long country. But first we explored a little of the place we were at. We went to the War Museum, a well arranged building displaying original weapons, tanks, bombs and airplanes, as well as horrible photographs and detailed information about the war between North and South Vietnam, the awful role of the United States in it and the after-effects on its people and nature. Nicely enough though, the display ends with a section dedicated to peace and agreement of respect between nations, which does its part of restoring a little of your faith in humanity after having presented the attrocities of which it's capable. We walked out of the museum to be "attacked" by at least five rickshaw drivers offering tours of the city, jumped on to one, had a great time for about eight blocks, got viciously overcharged and decided to start heading out of the city as soon as we could =).
Bicycle taxi in Ho Chi Minh City

Bicycle taxi in Ho Chi Minh City


Cat Tien National Park
Our first stop was Cat Tien National Park, where we finally got used to the idea that hard-core bargaining is part of the culture when after trying to lower the price for about five minutes to what we'd heard it was worth, we still got charged more than twice the value of our ride to the entrance. Juan spent long hours walking along the forest trails while I took to reading and going for shorter walks, and he got to see one of the most beautiful monkeys ever: the Gray Shanked Douc! Unfortunately they were really high up in the trees and he wasn't able to get a picture of them =(. The great thing about this park was it was so off the beaten track that the last five miles of the road to it were covered with different harvests spread out to dry on the sun-heated pavement. That left barely a car's width to drive on through there, and it made for a beautiful rural sight.
Mui Ne
Mui Ne was lovely with its long road along the beach filled with nice bars and pleasant people there for the windsurf and the night life. We stayed for a few days to enjoy the vibe and visit the surroundings. A must-do in Mui Ne is a tour to the dunes, that spread out for miles around the area! Children run up to you with long sheets of plastic, renting them for forty thousand dong (about two dollars) for you to slide down the sand hills at delightful speeds, but even without indulging in those little thrills, the mere view of the different dunes is beautiful. One has a river running through it, another is known for its bright orange sand, another is bordered by a glistening lake.
Cindy and calf at sand river

Cindy and calf at sand river


Red Sand Dunes

Red Sand Dunes

White sand dunes

White sand dunes

White sand dunes

White sand dunes


Juan carrying Cindy up hill

Juan carrying Cindy up hill


Juan

Juan


Na Trang
A very developed coastal city it reminded us of Cancun or Jaco with its large hotels lined up along the water and cushioned stretchers for rent under thatched palapas on the sand. What we enjoyed the most here was a free little art gallery we came upon by chance. We walked in attracted by the nice tree-shaded areas and what we thought were paintings depicting traditional Vietnamese scenes, but when we took a closer look at one of them we were astounded to discover they were embroidered works of art! The detail, the lighting, the composition, the shadows... they were beautiful! This form of embroidery is typically done with silk threads, and the artists use linear stitches placed one along the other so close together that even from a close distance it's easy to mistake the work for brush strokes. This was one place where we wished we weren't on a backpacker budget so we could bring home some of these gorgeous masterpieces!
Planning

Planning


Hoi An
This was both Juan's and my favorite town in all Vietnam. It's a World Heritage and easy to tell why. As soon as you walk into the city center the stone streets are shaded by trees, the elegant mix of French colonial, Japanese and mixed Asian architecture bursts with colorful crafts, silk workshops, small art galleries, Vietnamese embroidery, local and international gourmet restaurants and hundreds of tailor shops. Old women in non la (traditional conical hats) carry fruits and sweets in baskets, tourists and locals dress nicely and walk slow or pedal calmly on bicycles. During the day the bright colors of cloth lamps hanging along bridges and in the trees contrast with the sky, and during the night their lights give the narrow streets a feeling of constant celebration. Small drama clubs put up free plays, varied organized groups lead traditional games, and out of different restaurants you hear the friendly chatter of people having a good time.
During our stay here we went on a morning trip to Marble Mountain, which is a tall hill near the beach adorned with temples in its caverns and famous for the astounding quantity of marble found in its vicinity. The streets around Marble Mountain are packed with shop after shop selling marble sculptures of all sizes and themes. Even the waste baskets for the mountain were solid marble! But the vibe here in the mountain, which was really only about thirty minutes away from Hoi An is completely different from the cozy feeling of its near neighbor. We remembered with the over-insisting sales and the loud talking and fast moving people that we were in Vietnam, and soon were on our way back to our little haven.
Me as street vendor

Me as street vendor


Marble Mountain ceremony.

Marble Mountain ceremony.


Hue
Best Vietnamese food we had in the whole country! We really wanted to try more traditional food along the way but since we don't speak Vietnamese and few people speak English, we had had a difficult time sometimes trying to figure out what people were offering us (and we weren't too keen on being surprised with stuffed cats or anything of the sort). We read about Lien Hoa and were greatly satisfied with what at the moment seemed like the most delicious fried spring rolls we had ever eaten, along with "interactive" soup served in a large elevated bowl heated by a candle, with fresh varied vegetables on the side to put in gradually as you ate along. We had such a nice meal we returned the next day and largely over-ate to the point of regret. It still tasted great though.
Hanoi
The capital is as busy as it gets, and to cross the street you might as well just close your eyes and cross your fingers. There's no such thing as a functioning street light or stop sign or anything of the sort, and the millions of motorcycles simply ride around you guessing at your walking pace. The best way to cross safely, as a guy we met along the way wisely said, is to "be predictable", so that's what we tried to do. Tuk tuks and vendors go out of their way to follow you and annoy you into buying something from them; in contrast, if you try to ask someone a question and they don't understand you, most people will turn away and wave their hand at you to stop. We got ridiculously overcharged once by a metered taxi that marked more than three times as much as another metered taxi that had taken us earlier on the same route... But believe it or not, all of this is part of what makes Hanoi fun! It's just so different and so demented and chaotic that it works. If anything upset us we would soon laugh it off, and we were able to enjoy some nice attractions, like the ancient Temple of Literature and the unforgettable Water Puppet show.
Ba Be
Juan couldn't resist the temptation and we rented a 250 CC dirt bike which was the center of attention anywhere we stopped. I personally can barely tell the difference between that and a scooter, but what I did notice was everyone's heads turning as we would ride by. We went on a six hour trip up to Ba Be National Park, hoping to see some rural areas and wildlife along the way. The devastating reality is that there is little wildlife left in most of South East Asia -even in what little forest is protected- due to the thriving market for every conceivable wild animal for 'medicinal purposes', and also for just ordinary meals! In any community market and even upscale stores it's common to see snake skins adorning drums, live song birds sold in cages, stuffed civets or deer, jewelry made with boar husks or other animals claws, rare geckos and snakes fermented in bottles of rum... There just isn't anything near to any kind of awareness regarding conservation in the popular culture. So by going to national parks and spending a little on activities in those areas, besides hopefully increasing our chances of seeing some of these wonderful creatures in their natural habitat rather than -well- dead, we hoped we were also contribuiting our little grain of sand to show that nature tourism is worthwhile. Maybe little by little people will start seeing the benefits of conserving their natural treasures.
Ba Be displayed breathtaking views of its lake and the placid life of the countryside. We did manage to see three different species of snakes, which we were very, very excited about, but other than that we left the protected area with more of a cultural experience than with wildlife sightings. Juan walked past a family cooking up a dog for the national holiday (very common in Vietnam), and later we tried some delicious hand made sweets (not dog) packed in bamboo and banana leaves.
Honda Baja for our 600 km ride

Honda Baja for our 600 km ride


Juan

Juan


Resting our butts!

Resting our butts!


Cindy at road break...

Cindy at road break...

Lake at Ba Be National Park

Lake at Ba Be National Park

Cave at Ba Be

Cave at Ba Be

Cindy in Ba Be national park

Cindy in Ba Be national park

We think it's a juvenile cobra!!!!

We think it's a juvenile cobra!!!!


Colubrid at Ba Be National Park

Colubrid at Ba Be National Park


Amazing hawk! (Captive)

Amazing hawk! (Captive)


Eating rice from the bamboo it was cooked and packed in... Yum!

Eating rice from the bamboo it was cooked and packed in... Yum!


Dusty face after ride

Dusty face after ride


Cat Ba
Gorgeous cruise among the islands of the brilliant blue Halong Bay. We marveled at the scenery for hours on an old fashioned wooden boat, and loved the break on the white beach to just soak in the salty water after kayaking a while around it. Sadly we were not surprised at the immense variety of wildlife sold in the moving sea markets along the way. Everything from cuttlefish to sea horses to snakes to mantis shrimp to sting rays... Juan and I just wanted to jump in the water and free them all! Again though, it's all a question of culture and not cruelty, but as fast as we can we must do what's in our hands to become aware and share this awarenes with others, before we finish with what little we have left of our fantastic natural heritage.
Halong Bay

Halong Bay

Halong Bay

Halong Bay

Cat Ba National Park

Cat Ba National Park


Boat ride in the bay

Boat ride in the bay

Bay at Cat Ba island

Bay at Cat Ba island


Dien Bien
Our port of exit to Laos! By then all we could think of was our next step crossing to the neighboring country. Already we could sense the calm energy of the following land. Barely any vehicles on the streets, people walking slowly, every single shop closing down completely at noon for a daily nap and opening up again for only a couple hours after. We wandered around the market, had a baguette for dinner, and said our good byes to Vietnam after a good month of exploring its charms!

Posted by juan y Cindy 05:05 Archived in Vietnam Comments (0)

Cambodia

Cindy and Susanna at Royal Palace

Cindy and Susanna at Royal Palace


Our trip to Cambodia was very short since we had lots of places to cram in to the little time we have left for traveling, but it was very impressive! We flew into Phnom Penh just in time to catch our good friends from Borneo: Susanna, Romain, Charlotte and Khai for a couple nights.
Our first outing was to a couple of sites we will always remember for the horror they represent: Prison S21 and The Killing Fields. There is enough information available online to justify my avoiding going into details on the degenerate cruelty of the genocide that took place in Cambodia less than forty years ago under the rule of the Khmer Rouge led by Pol Pot, responsible for the killing of about three million people during the regime ( out of a total population of 8 million), but if you find yourself in Phnom Penh, do not hesitate to visit these sites. These are human tragedies we need to remind ourselves of to learn from and prevent in the story we continue to build as a society.
Skulls in Killing Fields.

Skulls in Killing Fields.

Rules!

Rules!

S-21

S-21


After this profoundly depressing first experience, we came out into the new Cambodia, a country emerging from disaster as a resilient, hard working community. Along with bicycles over-packed with anything from baskets to live chickens to bananas, tuk-tuks and motorbikes swerving 'round corners of busy streets and merchants announcing their products loudly we found a surprising silence in elaborate temples in the middle of the busy capital, and a pleasant energy along the river's edge, where every here and there we found a dancer with a portable stereo leading a group of passers by on a casual coreograph, brightening the night.
Silver Pagoda

Silver Pagoda


Soon we were in Siem Reap, famous for the immense area of temples of the Angkor kingdom. Overflowing with tourists for obvious reasons, the temples -in my opinion- lose a lot of their spiritual energy but none of their grandeur. They are imposing masterpieces, covered in detail and symbolism, glorious even under the effect of centuries exposed to the torments of weather and the incessant visit of thousands of tourists a day.
Ta Prohm

Ta Prohm


Ta Prohm

Ta Prohm

Ta Prohm

Ta Prohm

Cindy feeding taxi.

Cindy feeding taxi.

Cindy feeding taxi

Cindy feeding taxi

Bayron

Bayron

Bayron

Bayron

Bayron

Bayron

At Angkor Wat

At Angkor Wat


We loved every one we visited, but I think our favorite was Banteay Srei, a temple located thirty seven kilometers away from Siem Reap. Juan and I got up early one morning, rented a couple of bicycles and peddaled through small towns, along emerald rice fields, across markets of bamboo crafts and sugar cane goods, and finally got to our destination, renowned for its intricate stone carvings. Though the construction as a whole is very run down and it seems that you visit only the skeleton of a great building, the details in the work are astonishing. Juan took some pictures of some of the ones that he liked the most, but really every centimeter of the temple is sublime. The expressions of the tiny characters engraved in the rock and the stories they tell seem to come alive under your gaze. We stayed for as long as we could before we raced our way back to the hotel ahead of the dark.
Cambodia, local woman

Cambodia, local woman

Harvesting

Harvesting

Detail of engravings on stone

Detail of engravings on stone

Detail of engravings on stone

Detail of engravings on stone

Banteay Srei

Banteay Srei

Detail of engravings on stone

Detail of engravings on stone


A river cruise followed, taking us across the Tonle Sap lake (the largest in all southeast Asia), and along the vibrant Sangker river, through moving villages where people live on small boats and floating bamboo cottages, eating creatures from the water, whatever vegetables they can manage to grow on their boats and huts and also goods they purchase from passing boats. Along the way every once in a while a canoe would smoothly pull up to the side of the boat and one of our passengers would alight in what would seem like the middle of nowhere had a crowd of very ingenious river people not decided to stop and live there for a while.
River lady rowing to pick someone up from our boat

River lady rowing to pick someone up from our boat


Boat homes

Boat homes


So the trip was colorful. Long an loud, for the ride took about ten hours and the motor never ceased to sound like it was preparing to take off into space, but we enjoyed every minute of it, and were quite relaxed throughout the journey. When we pulled up to Battambang, however, our state of tranquillity was quickly broken by our first encounter with the race for tourists which we would later find to be the norm during the following weeks: we hadn't even set foot on the first step off the boat when at least ten posters were being shoved in my face by people trying to get me to choose their hotel to stay in! Men were yelling in our ears from all directions, I couldn't see Juan and I could only barely see the next step I was to put my foot on without tripping! I hurried up to Juan so we could look into our book to decide on a place, but the men kept talking all at once, listing the benefits of their place, showing us the price... I was overwhelmed! At some point we gave in and followed one of the men to a place, which was fine. From then on we got used to the hassling as part of the culture, and endured it gracefully for weeks later in Vietnam. Actually I think we were pretty good at keeping our good moods and polite ways instead of becoming annoyed and rude to people who were only trying to make a living. I love traveling with my man who is all peace and sees the good in every person!
Once settled we had a nice meal in Gecko Cafe, one of many wonderful initiatives throughout the area that consist of businesses focused on bringing higher salaries and training in better job opportunities to people who grow up in disadvantaged financial situations. The next morning we took a motorcycle ride along the country side and visited a temple before heading back to Phnom Penh for the night.
Cambodia is full of intriguing history, beautiful scenery, intricate temples and growing visiting opportunites. Its forests and fields are also burdened with land mines, remnants from the war threatening to blow up unaware walkers several decades after the horrific events that led them to be there. Here and there in the places we visited during our short stay we would come across a group of people selling crafts, a cute little restaurant, traditional musicians playing with their toes or only one hand or holding up a flute with their elbows. All these and other stands under a sign that would start out something like "Support land mine victims by...". How does a country pull itself up after such a horrendous chapter? Somehow the Cambodians seem to be doing it with their heads held high and smiling boldly.

Posted by juan y Cindy 04:41 Archived in Cambodia Comments (0)

Singapore

Diana meets her new home

Cindy and Diana!

Cindy and Diana!


The best part of our flash stay in Singapore was seeing my long-time friend Diana! Diana recently got a job with an architecture firm in this tiny but defiantly modern and luxurious new country (it became its own state only in 1965!). Singapore has risen in this short time to be a most organized and beautiful republic/city, full of art and inhabited by a great variety of people from different corners of the world who seem to share an air of elegance and good manners. Extreme example: chewing gum is completely prohibited in the entire country to avoid it ending up stuck in odd spots and making the place look dirty!
Supporting their olympic team!!

Supporting their olympic team!!


We loved the city with its harmonious public spaces, tasteful buildings, great food options and apparently safe streets. We loved meeting up with Diana and exploring the iconic sites through the eyes of someone who was for the first time seeing the city as her new home. Both Diana's and my eyes teared up at a free show at the main lake, where fountains of illluminated water shot up in dancing images displaying happy moments to the rhythm of "What a Wonderful World".
Crazy mall with "boat" on top! (Marina Bay)

Crazy mall with "boat" on top! (Marina Bay)

Singapore's famous ferris wheel: The Singapore Flyer

Singapore's famous ferris wheel: The Singapore Flyer


We loved it all, and might have stayed another day were it not so insanely expensive for two backpackers like ourselves. The best we could do for accommodation, for instance, was a fifty dollar single bed set in a hole in a wall punctured with another twenty or so bed-boxes! It was very clean and safe, and we were happy with it but it is crazy how a dollar can stretch so wide some places and be worth close to nothing in others, isn't it?50$ "Love Capsules"

50$ "Love Capsules"


So off we went the next day on a bus out to a new (and cheaper!) destination, very happy to have shared Singapore with Diana, albeit very briefly!
Trying to fit everything back into my backpack!

Trying to fit everything back into my backpack!

Posted by juan y Cindy 05:29 Archived in Singapore Comments (0)

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